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What is the treatment for torticollis?

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The doctor may teach you some specific exercises to do with your little one to help lengthen the tighter, short muscle and strengthen the muscle on the opposite side. You also might:

  • Offer the bottle or your breast in a way that gets her to turn away from the favored side.
  • Place toys so your baby is forced to look both ways.
  • Get her to play with her hands and feet.
  • Give her plenty of time on your tummy. Holding your baby this way will strengthen back and neck muscles and keep the back of her head from flattening.

From: What Is Torticollis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Boston Children’s Hospital: “Conditions and Treatments -- Torticollis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Congenital Muscular Torticollis.”

KidsHealth.org (The Nemours Foundation): “Infant Torticollis.”

Hospital for Special Surgery: “Congenital Muscular Torticollis -- An overview.”

Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America: “Study Guide -- Congenital Muscular Torticollis.”

NIH. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Klippel-Feil syndrome.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2018

SOURCES:

Boston Children’s Hospital: “Conditions and Treatments -- Torticollis.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Congenital Muscular Torticollis.”

KidsHealth.org (The Nemours Foundation): “Infant Torticollis.”

Hospital for Special Surgery: “Congenital Muscular Torticollis -- An overview.”

Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America: “Study Guide -- Congenital Muscular Torticollis.”

NIH. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Klippel-Feil syndrome.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2018

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How long is treatment needed for torticollis?

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