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When should I call my doctor about my newborn's diaper rash?

ANSWER

More than half of all babies get redness around their diaper area. You can treat it with a thick layer of zinc oxide or petroleum, but if it doesn’t get better within 48 to 72 hours, bleeds, or you see pus-filled sores, call your doctor. Your baby may have a yeast or bacterial infection and will need medication.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Newborn Baby: When to Call the Doctor.”

March of Dimes: “When to Call Your Baby’s Provider.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Infant Constipation,” “Infant Vomiting,” “Rashes and Skin Conditions,” “Baby's First Days: Bowel Movements & Urination,” “Waking Up Is (Sometimes) Hard to Do.”

Mayo Clinic: “Common Cold in Babies,” “Umbilical Cord Care: Do's and Don'ts for Parents, “Infant Jaundice.”

Seattle Children’s Hospital: “Should Your Child See a Doctor? Fever,” “Should Your Child See a Doctor? Jaundiced Newborn.”

Stanford Children’s Health: “Breathing Problems.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Newborn Baby: When to Call the Doctor.”

March of Dimes: “When to Call Your Baby’s Provider.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Infant Constipation,” “Infant Vomiting,” “Rashes and Skin Conditions,” “Baby's First Days: Bowel Movements & Urination,” “Waking Up Is (Sometimes) Hard to Do.”

Mayo Clinic: “Common Cold in Babies,” “Umbilical Cord Care: Do's and Don'ts for Parents, “Infant Jaundice.”

Seattle Children’s Hospital: “Should Your Child See a Doctor? Fever,” “Should Your Child See a Doctor? Jaundiced Newborn.”

Stanford Children’s Health: “Breathing Problems.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 19, 2019

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What information should I have ready when I call my newborn's doctor?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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