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When should you worry about your newborn's rash?

ANSWER

While most rashes are not serious, a few need very close attention:

  • Fluid-filled blisters (especially ones with opaque, yellowish fluid) can indicate a serious infection, like a bacterial infection or herpes.
  • Small red or purplish dots over the body (''petechiae'') can be caused by a viral infection or a potentially very serious bacterial infection. These will not lighten with pressure. Any infant with possible petechiae should be evaluated by a doctor immediately.

SOURCES: 

"The skin," Darmstadt, G. and Sidbury, R. , 17th edition. Behrman, R., Kliegman, R., and Jenson, H. (eds.), Saunders, 2004. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics

Mayo Clinic.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES: 

"The skin," Darmstadt, G. and Sidbury, R. , 17th edition. Behrman, R., Kliegman, R., and Jenson, H. (eds.), Saunders, 2004. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics

Mayo Clinic.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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