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Who gets Tay-Sachs disease?

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Tay-Sachs is a very rare inherited disorder. Children born with it usually don’t live past age 5.

Any parent can have a copy of the faulty gene that causes Tay-Sachs. The chances of being a carrier are higher among American Jews, non-Jewish French Canadians who live near the St. Lawrence River, and Cajuns in Louisiana. If both parents carry the Tay-Sachs gene, there’s a 1 in 4 chance that any child of theirs will get the disease.

From: What is Tay-Sachs Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Tay-Sachs disease.”

National Human Genome Research Institute: “Learning About Tay-Sachs Disease.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine Genetics Home Reference: “Tay-Sachs Disease.”

National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association: “Classic Infantile Tay-Sachs,” “Symptom Management,” “Adult Onset Tay-Sachs.”

National Organization for Rare Diseases: “Tay Sachs Disease.”

Genetics in Medicine: “Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: Phenotypic characterization and genotypic correlations in 21 affected patients.”

Cleveland Clinic Children’s: “Tay-Sachs.”

American College of Physicians, “Pulmonary Disease.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Tay-Sachs disease.”

National Human Genome Research Institute: “Learning About Tay-Sachs Disease.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine Genetics Home Reference: “Tay-Sachs Disease.”

National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association: “Classic Infantile Tay-Sachs,” “Symptom Management,” “Adult Onset Tay-Sachs.”

National Organization for Rare Diseases: “Tay Sachs Disease.”

Genetics in Medicine: “Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: Phenotypic characterization and genotypic correlations in 21 affected patients.”

Cleveland Clinic Children’s: “Tay-Sachs.”

American College of Physicians, “Pulmonary Disease.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 16, 2018

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