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  • Question 1/10

    Adding 2 ounces of water to powdered formula is the same as adding:

  • Answer 1/10

    Adding 2 ounces of water to powdered formula is the same as adding:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most powdered formula calls for one level scoop of powder to 2 ounces, or 1/4 cup, of water.

    Don't eyeball it. Adding too little water could leave your baby thirsty. Adding too much can cause seizures and may not give her enough calories for proper nutrition.

  • Question 1/10

    After mixing powdered formula, how long can you leave it at room temperature?

  • Answer 1/10

    After mixing powdered formula, how long can you leave it at room temperature?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Once you mix formula, you should feed it to your baby or refrigerate it within 1 to 2 hours. If it's been sitting out for more than 2 hours, throw it out. And throw out any formula she doesn't finish drinking.

    You can store prepared formula in the refrigerator for 24 hours and open containers of ready-made or concentrated formula for 48 hours in the fridge too.

  • Question 1/10

    To warm a bottle of formula evenly, put it in the microwave.

  • Answer 1/10

    To warm a bottle of formula evenly, put it in the microwave.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Microwaves don't heat evenly, so the formula could burn your baby's mouth. To warm a bottle safely, run it under hot water or put it in a pan of hot water for a few minutes. Shake the bottle and squirt a little on the inside of your wrist to make sure it's lukewarm. Or see if she likes formula cold or at room temperature -- that's even easier!

  • Answer 1/10

    It may help your baby switch from breastfeeding to bottle-feeding if:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The switch is likely to go smoother if she doesn't have the usual clues telling her it's time to eat. Have someone else give the bottle in a place that won't remind her of breastfeeding.

    This is a great time for your partner or a new caregiver to get involved.

  • Answer 1/10

    Spitting up may mean:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Babies spit up! That's normal. It's not like vomiting, which is more forceful and can upset your baby.

    Check the size of the hole in the bottle's nipple. If it's too big, she may be drinking too much milk or formula. If it's too small, she might be gulping in air. When you hold the bottle upside down, just a few drops should come out. If it's more or less, you may want to try a different nipple.

  • Question 1/10

    After her first month, a bottle-fed baby usually takes in about:  

  • Answer 1/10

    After her first month, a bottle-fed baby usually takes in about:  

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    By 6 months, it may be more like 6 to 8 ounces, four or five times a day. Those are just averages. Your baby may be different. Your doctor will let you know at wellness visits if she's eating too much or too little.

  • Question 1/10

    Avoid iron-fortified formula. It causes constipation.

  • Answer 1/10

    Avoid iron-fortified formula. It causes constipation.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You may have heard that babies who drink low-iron formula have softer poop. But even iron-fortified formula has only a little iron -- enough to prevent anemia and help your baby grow well, but not so much that she gets constipated.

     Low-iron formula doesn’t give babies enough iron. The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that all bottle-fed infants drink iron-fortified formula until age 1.

  • Question 1/10

    In a pinch, it's OK to bottle-feed your infant cow's milk.

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    Answer 1/10

    In a pinch, it's OK to bottle-feed your infant cow's milk.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Never give your baby cow's milk before the age of 1. Cow’s milk can stress a newborn's kidneys, can cause intestinal bleeding, and might cause anemia.

    Formula has added nutrients that infants need. After one year, she can drink whole milk.

  • Question 1/10

    You don't need to boil baby bottles and nipples after every use.

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    Answer 1/10

    You don't need to boil baby bottles and nipples after every use.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Just wash bottles, nipples, and caps in hot, soapy water before you use them for the first time, and then after every feeding. Also, make sure you wash your hands before you feed your baby.

  • Question 1/10

    You can't bond with your baby during bottle-feeding like during breastfeeding.

  • Answer 1/10

    You can't bond with your baby during bottle-feeding like during breastfeeding.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When you give your baby a bottle, you can make it a warm, loving experience. Hold her closely so she looks at you while she feeds. Look into her eyes and coo and talk gently. For skin-to-skin time, undress your baby to her diaper. Cuddle her to your chest, with her head just under your chin while you feed. Put a blanket over her to keep her warm.

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    Results:

    Good job! You know your bottle-feeding basics.

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    Not bad, but you could do better. Read up on bottle-feeding and try again.

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    You could do better. Read up on bottle-feeding and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Renee A. Alli, MD on February 25, 2019 Medically Reviewed on February 25, 2019

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli, MD on
February 25, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY: Getty Images

SOURCES:

CDC: "Breastfeeding Report Card, United States/2013."
Family Doctor: "Infant Formula."
Healthy Children: "Formula Form and Function: Powders, Concentrates, and Ready-to-Feed," "Introducing the Bottle," "Burping, Hiccups, and Spitting Up," "Bottle Feeding Basics," "Choosing a Formula," "Why Formula Instead of Cow's Milk?" "Practical Bottle Feeding Tips."
Mojave County WIC: "Infant Feeding Myths."
Nemours Foundation: "Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding," "Formula Feeding FAQs: Preparation and Storage."
Palo Alto Medical Foundation: "When Your Baby Refuses to Bottle-Feed," "Basics of Formula Feeding."
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital: "Mixing powdered formula."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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