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  • Question 1/9

    Why does the doctor dangle a toy in front of your baby?

  • Answer 1/9

    Why does the doctor dangle a toy in front of your baby?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The eye chart your doc uses on you won’t work for babies since they can’t read. But your pediatrician can check your child’s sight in other ways. By using a toy or a light to get their attention, your doctor can test how well their eyes follow an object. This also shows the doctor how far away your baby can see. There’s no need for more tests unless your doctor suspects a problem.

  • Question 1/9

    A pediatrician asks about the milk your toddler drinks because they want to know if:

  • Answer 1/9

    A pediatrician asks about the milk your toddler drinks because they want to know if:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Babies under 12 months should drink only breast milk or formula. At 1 year, they can switch to milk -- and whole is best for most kids. Your little one is doing a lot of growing between age 1 and 2. They need the fat in whole milk to build a healthy brain and nervous system. After age 2, they can switch to low-fat.

  • Question 1/9

    Your pediatrician wants to know when your home was built.

  • Answer 1/9

    Your pediatrician wants to know when your home was built.

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    • Correct Answer:

    What the doctor is looking for: exposure to lead. It’s poisonous, but before 1978, it was a common paint ingredient. If your house was built before then, there’s a higher chance your little explorer could get it in their mouth or breathe in lead dust. The doctor can do a blood test to check for lead levels.

  • Question 1/9

    Why do doctors measure your child’s height and weight at every visit?

  • Answer 1/9

    Why do doctors measure your child’s height and weight at every visit?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Every kid is different, but there are “norms” that help the doctor see how your child is growing and developing. They take your child’s stats and puts them in a growth chart to keep track of patterns. If they seem way off from the average, or if their patterns change suddenly, it can alert your doctor to a problem.

  • Question 1/9

    The doctor wants to know if your child points at things or smiles when you do. Why?

  • Answer 1/9

    The doctor wants to know if your child points at things or smiles when you do. Why?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Problems with these behaviors could be early signs of autism. The American Academy of Pediatrics says every child should have a screening test for the condition starting at the 18-month checkup. The office will give you a questionnaire to fill out, and also watch how your toddler interacts with others.

  • Question 1/9

    When does your doctor start tracking your child’s body mass index (BMI)?

  • Answer 1/9

    When does your doctor start tracking your child’s body mass index (BMI)?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Doctors use your child’s height and weight to calculate their BMI starting at age 2. With this number, your doctor can track how your child’s weight changes over time. If they are moving toward an unhealthy BMI, your doctor can let you know the best ways to keep them in the healthy range.

  • Question 1/9

    Why does the doctor hit your child’s knees with a rubber hammer?

  • Answer 1/9

    Why does the doctor hit your child’s knees with a rubber hammer?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s a good reason the doc whacks your little one: They are checking to be sure their brain is talking to the rest of their body. The “knee-jerk” reflex that happens when they tap part of their knee shows them that their nervous system is working the way it should.

  • Question 1/9

    The doctor hears a heart murmur through the stethoscope. It’s a bigger worry when your child is:

  • Answer 1/9

    The doctor hears a heart murmur through the stethoscope. It’s a bigger worry when your child is:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Hearing soft "musical" noises between heartbeats for kids from ages 1 to 5 is usually nothing to worry about. A murmur in a baby under 6 months probably needs to be checked out. If your doctor hears one in your baby’s early months, or if your baby has other symptoms, they may send you to see a pediatric cardiologist.

  • Question 1/9

    When your doctor thumps and presses on your child’s belly, they're checking for:

  • Answer 1/9

    When your doctor thumps and presses on your child’s belly, they're checking for:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It may make your child giggle, but those tummy touches aren’t meant to tickle her. By mashing and tapping on your child’s middle, a doctor can learn lots of things about their insides, like if their liver or spleen is puffy or sore. Doctors can’t feel kidney stones -- they’re inside the urinary tract.

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Sources | Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on October 13, 2019 Medically Reviewed on October 13, 2019

Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on
October 13, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

American Optometric Association: “What the optometrist is looking for during the assessment.”

Kid’s Health: “Lead Poisoning,” “Growth Charts,” “What are Reflexes?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Kids’ Fevers: When to Worry, When to Relax.”

New York State Department of Health: “Lead Poisoning is a Danger for Every Baby and Child. Here's What You Should Know.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Ask the Pediatrician,” “How Pediatricians Screen for Autism,” “Obesity and BMI,” “Heart Murmur.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Why the Healthcare Provider Presses Your Belly.”

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.