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Are there fatty foods that are good for my kids?

ANSWER

Your kids need some fat in their diet, just not too much. And some types are better choices than others.

Omega-3 fatty acids, for example, help brain development in babies and young children. Compared to saturated fats, omega-3s and monounsaturated fats may help your body stay more sensitive to insulin, which lowers the risk of diabetes.

These foods are excellent sources of omega-3s or monounsaturated fat:

  • Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, herring, mackerel, and anchovies
  • Eggs
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Olive oil
  • Canola oil
  • Ground flaxseed

From: Parents' Grocery Shopping Tips WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein and Amino Acids, 2002/2005, Food and Nutrition Board, National Academies Press.

Gidding S.S. , February 2006. Pediatrics

Fox, M.K. 2004. Journal of the American Dietetic Association,

Taylor, C.A. August 2007. Journal of the American Dietetic Association,

Johnson, L. , April 2008. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Fulgoni, V.L., May 2008.  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,

Anderson, M. August 2006. Journal of the American Dietetic Association,

Nutrients in Food, by Elizabeth Hands from ESHA Research, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000.

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on April 10, 2018

SOURCES:

Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein and Amino Acids, 2002/2005, Food and Nutrition Board, National Academies Press.

Gidding S.S. , February 2006. Pediatrics

Fox, M.K. 2004. Journal of the American Dietetic Association,

Taylor, C.A. August 2007. Journal of the American Dietetic Association,

Johnson, L. , April 2008. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Fulgoni, V.L., May 2008.  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,

Anderson, M. August 2006. Journal of the American Dietetic Association,

Nutrients in Food, by Elizabeth Hands from ESHA Research, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000.

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on April 10, 2018

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What should I look for on nutrition labels?

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