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Are there things I can do at home to help my child who stutters?

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There are a lot of things you and other family members can do to help a child who stutters get beyond his or her problems with speaking:

  • Create opportunities for talking that are relaxed, fun, and enjoyable.
  • Find times to engage your child in conversations without distractions of TV or other interruptions.
  • Don't be critical of your child's speech or insist on precise or correct speech.
  • Don't put pressure on your child to entertain or interact verbally with other people when stuttering becomes a problem.
  • Listen attentively to what your child is saying, maintaining normal eye contact without displaying signs of impatience or frustration.
  • Avoid reacting negatively when your child stutters, correcting his or her speech, or completing your child's sentences.
  • Although phrases such as "Stop and take a deep breath" or "Slow down" may be meant to help your child, they can actually make your child more self-conscious and should not be used.
  • Model a slow, relaxed way of speaking to help your child slow down his or her own speech.
  • Don't be afraid to talk with your child about stuttering. If he or she asks questions or expresses concern, listen and answer in ways that will help your child understand that disruptions in speech are normal and that everyone experiences them to some degree.

From: Stuttering WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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