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How can you avoid germs when traveling with children?

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Your child’s immune system isn’t as strong as yours. So washing hands often is one key step to avoiding nasty germs. Wash for 20 seconds before meals and after using the bathroom. Help your child keep their hands out of their mouths. Carry an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Get your child current on vaccines for measles, whooping cough, and other diseases. The CDC recommends an annual flu shot for everyone six months old and older.

From: How to Avoid Germs When You Travel WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Neumann, K. , March 1, 2002. AAP News

James Conway, MD, associate professor of pediatrics, division of pediatric infectious disease, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

Athena P. Kourtis, MD, PhD, MPH, pediatrician, CDC; author, , Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. Keeping Your Child Healthy in a Germ-Filled World

David Shlim, MD, travel medicine specialist, Jackson Hill, Wyo.; president-elect, International Society of Travel Medicine.

Jeffrey R. Starke, MD, director of infection control, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston; professor and vice chairman of pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.

Robert Donofrio, PhD, director, microbiology lab, NSF International.

UMass Amherst: "Bacteria in Aircraft Cabin Air May Pose Less of a Risk to Travelers Than Imagined, Says UMass Amherst Researcher."

CDC: "Flu-Free, Healthy Travel this Winter;" "Flu Season Is Here: Vaccinate to Protect You and Your Loved Ones from Flu;" "Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives;" and "Avoiding Germs in Swimming Pools."

American Red Cross: "Don't Let the Flu Ruin Your Holiday."

Healthy Child, Healthy World: "What You Should Know About Hand Sanitizers and Your Health."

U.S. Dept. of State: "EPA Releases Passenger Aircraft Water-Testing Results."

EPA: "Basic ADWR Information."

University of Virginia: "Do you want to catch a cold? Your next stay at a hotel room might give you a good chance."

American Academy of Pediatricians: "Travel Safety Tips."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on December 05, 2017

SOURCES:

Neumann, K. , March 1, 2002. AAP News

James Conway, MD, associate professor of pediatrics, division of pediatric infectious disease, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

Athena P. Kourtis, MD, PhD, MPH, pediatrician, CDC; author, , Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. Keeping Your Child Healthy in a Germ-Filled World

David Shlim, MD, travel medicine specialist, Jackson Hill, Wyo.; president-elect, International Society of Travel Medicine.

Jeffrey R. Starke, MD, director of infection control, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston; professor and vice chairman of pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.

Robert Donofrio, PhD, director, microbiology lab, NSF International.

UMass Amherst: "Bacteria in Aircraft Cabin Air May Pose Less of a Risk to Travelers Than Imagined, Says UMass Amherst Researcher."

CDC: "Flu-Free, Healthy Travel this Winter;" "Flu Season Is Here: Vaccinate to Protect You and Your Loved Ones from Flu;" "Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives;" and "Avoiding Germs in Swimming Pools."

American Red Cross: "Don't Let the Flu Ruin Your Holiday."

Healthy Child, Healthy World: "What You Should Know About Hand Sanitizers and Your Health."

U.S. Dept. of State: "EPA Releases Passenger Aircraft Water-Testing Results."

EPA: "Basic ADWR Information."

University of Virginia: "Do you want to catch a cold? Your next stay at a hotel room might give you a good chance."

American Academy of Pediatricians: "Travel Safety Tips."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on December 05, 2017

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