PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How is stuttering treated?

ANSWER

Talk with your doctor if you are concerned about your child's development, including stuttering. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist known as a speech-language pathologist (SLP) who can evaluate your child and determine whether or not there is a risk of a long-term problem. In most cases involving children, treatment primarily focuses on training and working with the parents to develop techniques to help the child cope with and get beyond his or her stuttering. There is no "cure" for stuttering, and no drug has been approved to treat stuttering. Sometimes the SLP will work directly with the child to develop individual behavioral techniques that can help the child learn not to stutter. The actual therapy may vary from child to child depending on the child's particular circumstances.

From: Stuttering WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

When should I seek professional help for my child's stuttering?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.