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Is there a difference between normal stuttering and stuttering that is a problem?

ANSWER

It isn't always possible to tell when a child's stuttering will become a more serious problem. But there are some signs to look for:

  • Tension and a struggle with facial muscles
  • Voice rising in pitch with repetitions
  • Effort and tension in trying to speak
  • Changing words or using extra sounds to start talking

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on July 2, 2020

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on July 2, 2020

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