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What is a bedwetting alarm?

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Working with your child to use a bedwetting alarm -- a device that is worn and makes noise to wake the child when it gets wet -- can also help your child feel like he is doing something to stop wetting the bed. You might want to compare your child’s active involvement in addressing bedwetting to something you do for a problem you have, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising to lose weight, or wearing glasses to help you see better.

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation web site: “ .” Bedwetting

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: “ ,” .” BedwettingPractice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Enuresis

American Academy of Family Physicians web site: “ ).” Enuresis (Bed-Wetting

Johnson, M, “Nocturnal enuresis,” Urologic Nursing, December 1998.

Gregory Fritz, MD, professor and director, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychology, Brown Medical School.

Howard Bennett, MD, author, Waking Up Dry: A Guide to Help Children Overcome Bedwetting.

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation web site: “ .” Bedwetting

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: “ ,” .” BedwettingPractice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Enuresis

American Academy of Family Physicians web site: “ ).” Enuresis (Bed-Wetting

Johnson, M, “Nocturnal enuresis,” Urologic Nursing, December 1998.

Gregory Fritz, MD, professor and director, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychology, Brown Medical School.

Howard Bennett, MD, author, Waking Up Dry: A Guide to Help Children Overcome Bedwetting.

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

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