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What should you know about stuttering in children?

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Stuttering is not uncommon in children between the ages of 2 and 5. For many children, it's simply part of learning to use language and putting words together to form sentences. It may come and go, and it may last for a few weeks or for a couple of years. Most children outgrow stuttering on their own without professional intervention. But for some, stuttering can become a life-long condition that causes problems in school and in functioning as an adult.

From: Stuttering WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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