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When should I seek professional help for my child's stuttering?

ANSWER

Signs to look for that suggest you should talk with your child's doctor include:

  • Stuttering that happens more often and gets worse over time
  • Stuttering that is accompanied by body or facial movements
  • Speech that is especially difficult or strained
  • Avoiding situations that require talking
  • Vocal tension that results in rising pitch while talking
  • Stuttering that continues after a child has turned 5

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on July 2, 2020

SOURCES:

Stuttering Foundation of America: "F.A.Q."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering."

KidsHealth.org: "Stuttering."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Stuttering."

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Stuttering."

Stuttering Foundation of America: "Did You Know ..."

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on July 2, 2020

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Are there things I can do at home to help my child who stutters?

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