Raising Fit Kids: Healthy Weight

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How can I get my teen to exercise?

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Health experts recommend that teens get at least 60 minutes of exercise a day. But if your child isn’t too active now, she’ll need to build up to that goal. Try these tactics to get her moving:

Help her set small, achievable goals. It’s fine to start with 10 minutes a day -- as long as she does it. Then have her slowly add a few minutes every day. When she succeeds with small steps, she’ll build her self-confidence and stay motivated.

Get the whole family involved. Take family hikes, or go on bike rides together. Keep jump ropes and hand weights around the home. Get pedometers for everyone to help you all take more steps. It’s easier for a teen to move more if everyone is doing it together.

From: How to Help An Overweight Teen WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Lawrence Cheskin, MD, associate professor, Johns Hopkins Medical School; director, Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, Baltimore.

William H. Dietz, MD, PhD, director, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta.

Karen Donato, SM, coordinator, Overweight and Obesity Research Applications, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.

Dan Kirschenbaum, PhD, vice president, Clinical Services, Wellspring -- a division of CRC Health; director, Center for Behavioral Medicine & Sport Psychology, Chicago; professor, psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago.

Kristen Liebl, LRD, Sanford Medical Center, Fargo, N.D.

Ann O. Scheimann, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore.

Michelle Van Beek, MD, pediatrician, Weight Management Clinic, Sanford Children's Clinic, Sioux Falls, S.D.

Kirschenbaum, D. , February 2009. Obesity Management

Kelly, K. , Jan. 12, 2010. Obesity Reviews

Rodearmel, S. , October 2007. American Academy of Pediatrics

Stice, E. , 2006. Psychological Bulletin

US Preventive Services Taskforce, , February 2010. Pediatrics

Barlow, S. , 2007. Pediatrics

Taveras, E. , May 2005. Obesity Research

Hettema, J. , 2005. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology

American Medical Association: "Expert Committee Recommendations on the Assessment, Prevention and Treatment of Child and Adolescent Overweight and Obesity."

My Overweight Child: "What About Over-the-Counter Weight Loss Pills?"

USDA: "America's Eating Habits: Changes and Consequences."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

SOURCES: 

Lawrence Cheskin, MD, associate professor, Johns Hopkins Medical School; director, Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, Baltimore.

William H. Dietz, MD, PhD, director, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta.

Karen Donato, SM, coordinator, Overweight and Obesity Research Applications, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.

Dan Kirschenbaum, PhD, vice president, Clinical Services, Wellspring -- a division of CRC Health; director, Center for Behavioral Medicine & Sport Psychology, Chicago; professor, psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago.

Kristen Liebl, LRD, Sanford Medical Center, Fargo, N.D.

Ann O. Scheimann, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore.

Michelle Van Beek, MD, pediatrician, Weight Management Clinic, Sanford Children's Clinic, Sioux Falls, S.D.

Kirschenbaum, D. , February 2009. Obesity Management

Kelly, K. , Jan. 12, 2010. Obesity Reviews

Rodearmel, S. , October 2007. American Academy of Pediatrics

Stice, E. , 2006. Psychological Bulletin

US Preventive Services Taskforce, , February 2010. Pediatrics

Barlow, S. , 2007. Pediatrics

Taveras, E. , May 2005. Obesity Research

Hettema, J. , 2005. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology

American Medical Association: "Expert Committee Recommendations on the Assessment, Prevention and Treatment of Child and Adolescent Overweight and Obesity."

My Overweight Child: "What About Over-the-Counter Weight Loss Pills?"

USDA: "America's Eating Habits: Changes and Consequences."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

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How can I help my overweight kid with their self esteem?

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