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  • Answer 1/8

    It's best to deal with a grocery store meltdown by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Meltdowns happen with all toddlers. When one starts, take a deep breath to calm yourself. Then, look them in the eyes, quietly acknowledge their feelings, and tell them what you expect them to do: “I know you're mad. But I need you to stop crying.” Stand your ground. When you cave to a tantrum, you teach your child that it's a good way to get what they want. If they can't get self-control, you may have to leave the store and come back later.

     

    Do your best to plan for smoother shopping trips, too. Go right after nap time and after your child's had a healthy snack.

  • Question 1/8

    To calm your antsy child in the doctor's waiting room, it's best to:

  • Answer 1/8

    To calm your antsy child in the doctor's waiting room, it's best to:

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    • Correct Answer:

    When you dole out snacks to calm your child, you teach them that eating is an OK way to fight boredom. This association can stick with them for life. Instead, try entertaining them with books or toys to prevent a tantrum.

  • Answer 1/8

    Soothe a child who keeps getting out of bed by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A sippy cup of water by your child's bed is OK, but not milk or juice. Sugars in these drinks can pool around their teeth and cause cavities.

     

    What your toddler really needs to help them settle in for sleep is a soothing bedtime rituallike the 4 Bs: Bath, Brush (teeth), Book, and Bed. If they get up after lights out, calmly walk them back to their room and tuck them in. Don't lecture or talk on the way -- that only reinforces their behavior. You might have to do this multiple times. Keep at it, and eventually it will stick.

  • Question 1/8

    Nap time was supposed to start a long time ago, but there are more errands to run:

  • Answer 1/8

    Nap time was supposed to start a long time ago, but there are more errands to run:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Exhaustion is one of the main reasons that toddlers throw tantrums. Overstimulation is another. So it's not a good idea to thrust a worn-out kid into a bright, noisy environment to check off the last few items on your to-do list. You'll both be better off -- and less stressed -- if you keep to a naptime schedule and finish your errands later when your kid is well-rested and happy.

  • Answer 1/8

    When your child seems more clingy than usual:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Keep in mind that most toddlers need just minutes -- not hours -- of your undivided time. They have a pattern of playing by themselves, showing you what they're up to, and then playing again. Studies show that toddlers check in with their parents about seven times an hour. That may sound like a lot, but they typically only want 30 to 60 seconds of your time. Talk and play for a while with your child, and then let them go back to doing their own thing.

  • Question 1/8

    Your child is sad because their brother is away on a play date: 

  • Answer 1/8

    Your child is sad because their brother is away on a play date: 

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Playing with your child is much better for their mental and physical development than trying to fix their feelings with TV. It's OK to watch a show or a movie with them sometimes, but experts say parents shouldn't rely on screens to soothe kids. Instead, plan a trip to the park or build a blanket fort in the living room. You'll help them feel better and encourage them to be active, not sedentary.

  • Answer 1/8

    Encourage your child to use the potty by:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Sweets may work to motivate your child, but rewarding them with food or toys can backfire. They'll start to think that being good equals getting goodies.

     

    Toddlers respond equally well to words of praise (“Yay! What a big girl you are!”) and social rewards (“You haven't had an accident all day, so we're going to the park!”). Words and actions like these will have a bigger effect on their behavior and self-esteem in the long run than a handful of treats.

  • Question 1/8

    Distract a child from the pain of getting shots with:

  • Answer 1/8

    Distract a child from the pain of getting shots with:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Juice may seem like a good option. But research shows that distraction -- singing, talking, telling a joke, or having a child look at an interesting object -- works well, too. Plus, they won't come to rely on the taste of sugar to calm down.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Toddler whisperer! Sounds like you tame your child's tantrums and other challenging times with grace. Congrats! You are setting your toddler up for healthy lifetime habits.

    Results:

    You're a realist with room to grow. There are going to be moments when you have to take the path of least resistance. The great news is that you seem to know the healthier thing to do in most cases. Just remember the next time a meltdown happens -- take a deep breath and think about the choices you can make.

    Results:

    Keeping a toddler happy and healthy is challenging! While it hasn't always been easy, you have options. Try using new info you gained from this quiz. If you feel stuck, try talking with your child's pediatrician. They may offer other solutions or insights.

Sources | Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on May 26, 2020 Medically Reviewed on May 26, 2020

Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on
May 26, 2020

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

1) DorianGray / Vetta
2) Keith Brofsky / UpperCut Images

SOURCES:

Ellyn Satter, registered dietitian and author of Your Child's Weight: Helping Without Harming .

University of Michigan Health System: “Pain and Your Infant: Medical Procedures, Circumcision and Teething.”

Felt, B. Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine , July 2000.                

Reis, E. Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine , November 2003.                                        

Michele Borba, educational psychologist and author of The Big book of Parenting Solutions .

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Where We Stand: TV Viewing Time.”

Pagani, L. Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, May 2010.                                                                                      

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry: “Policy on Early Childhood Caries: Classifications, Consequences and Preventive Strategies,” “Use Only Water in Sippy Cups or Increase Cavity Risk.”

Satter, E. Your Child's Weight: Helping Without Harming , Kelcy Press, 2005.

Borba, M. The Big book of Parenting Solutions , Jossey-Bass, 2009.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.