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How can Parkinson's disease affect your life?

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Most people who have Parkinson’s live a normal to a nearly normal lifespan, but the disease can be life changing.

For some people, treatment keeps the symptoms at bay, and they're mostly mild. For others, the disease is much more serious and really limits what you're able to do.

As it gets worse, it makes it harder and harder to do daily activities like getting out of bed, driving, or going to work. Even writing can seem like a tough task. And in later stages, it can cause dementia.

From: What Is Parkinson's Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Health Service: "Parkinson's Disease."

Parkinson's Disease Foundation: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

Mayo Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

NIH, National Institute on Aging: "Parkinson's Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease: An Overview."

National Parkinson Foundation: "The Stages of Parkinson's Disease."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 11, 2017

SOURCES:

National Health Service: "Parkinson's Disease."

Parkinson's Disease Foundation: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

Mayo Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

NIH, National Institute on Aging: "Parkinson's Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease: An Overview."

National Parkinson Foundation: "The Stages of Parkinson's Disease."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 11, 2017

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