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How is Parkinson's disease diagnosed?

ANSWER

There's no one test for Parkinson's. A lot of it's based on your symptoms and health history, but it could take some time to figure it out.

Part of the process is ruling out other conditions that look like Parkinson's. The docotor may do a DaT scan, which looks for dopamine in the brain. This can aid in a diagnosis.

Because there is no single test, it's very important to go to a doctor who knows a lot about it, early on. It's easy to miss.

If you do have it, your doctor might use  the Hoehn and Yahr scale to tell you what stage of the disease you're in. It ranks how severe your symptoms are from 1 to 5, where 5 is the most serious.

SOURCES:

National Health Service: "Parkinson's Disease."

Parkinson's Disease Foundation: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

Mayo Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

NIH, National Institute on Aging: "Parkinson's Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease: An Overview."

National Parkinson Foundation: "The Stages of Parkinson's Disease."

Reviewed by Christopher Melinosky on August 15, 2019

SOURCES:

National Health Service: "Parkinson's Disease."

Parkinson's Disease Foundation: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

Mayo Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "What Is Parkinson's Disease?"

NIH, National Institute on Aging: "Parkinson's Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "Parkinson's Disease: An Overview."

National Parkinson Foundation: "The Stages of Parkinson's Disease."

Reviewed by Christopher Melinosky on August 15, 2019

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How is Parkinson's disease treated?

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