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What are tips for traveling with Parkinson's medications?

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  • Always have at least a day's dosage of medication in your pocket or purse.
  • Carry all of your medications with you instead of in checked baggage.
  • Pack enough medications to last the whole trip.
  • Avoid needing to refill your prescriptions out of town and especially overseas.
  • Check with your doctor about any over-the-counter drugs, such as those for motion sickness or diarrhea, before you leave.
  • Find out if your medications are "sun-sensitive" and plan accordingly.
  • Carry a list and schedule of medications with you.
  • If you’re traveling through different time zones, use an alarm on your watch or phone to remember to take your meds.

From: Traveling With Parkinson's Disease WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on October 21, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 10/21/2018

SOURCES:

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: "Driving When You Have Parkinson's Disease."

National Parkinson Foundation: "Parkinson's Onboard: Traveling with PD."

Parkinson's Disease Foundation: "Traveling with PD."

PDCaregiver.org: "Traveling with Parkinson's."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on October 21, 2018

SOURCES:

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: "Driving When You Have Parkinson's Disease."

National Parkinson Foundation: "Parkinson's Onboard: Traveling with PD."

Parkinson's Disease Foundation: "Traveling with PD."

PDCaregiver.org: "Traveling with Parkinson's."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on October 21, 2018

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What are tips for traveling by car with Parkinson's disease?

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