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What is the link between depression and Parkinson's disease?

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Depression is common in people with Parkinson's disease. Often, the depression starts years before any of the other Parkinson's symptoms show up.

Depression can sometimes make your Parkinson's symptoms worse. Get in touch with your doctor if you notice any of these things happening to you for longer than 2 weeks at a time.

  • You have a depressed mood.
  • You can't find pleasure in things that you once enjoyed.
  • You have trouble getting to sleep or you sleep too much.
  • Your appetite changes.
  • You feel tired or your energy levels change.
  • It's hard to concentrate.
  • You have low self-esteem.
  • You have thoughts of death.

From: Parkinson's Disease and Mental Health WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Mental Disturbances Associated with Parkinson's Disease."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Depression and Parkinson's Disease."

National Parkinson Foundation: "Parkinson's Disease: Mind, Mood, & Memory."

American Academy of Neurology: "Screening and Treatment for Depression, Dementia, and Psychosis With Parkinson Disease."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on August 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Mental Disturbances Associated with Parkinson's Disease."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Depression and Parkinson's Disease."

National Parkinson Foundation: "Parkinson's Disease: Mind, Mood, & Memory."

American Academy of Neurology: "Screening and Treatment for Depression, Dementia, and Psychosis With Parkinson Disease."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on August 11, 2017

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How do you treat depression in Parkinson's disease?

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