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What should you do if you have no appetite with Parkinson's disease?

ANSWER

When you have Parkinson's, some days you just may not feel like eating at all. Talk to your doctor. Sometimes, depression can cause poor appetite. Your hunger likely will return when you get treatment. Other steps you can take:

Walk or do another light activity to rev up your appetite.

Drink beverages after you’ve finished eating so you don’t feel full before the meal.

Eat the high-calorie foods on your plate first. But avoid empty calories from sugary sodas, candies, and chips.

Choose high-protein and high-calorie snacks, including:

  • Ice cream
  • Cheese
  • Granola bars
  • Custard
  • Sandwiches
  • Nachos with cheese
  • Eggs
  • Crackers with peanut butter
  • Cereal with half and half
  • Greek yogurt

From: Eating Right With Parkinson's Disease WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on October 28, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 10/28/2017

SOURCES:

Parkinson’s UK: “Diet.”

PLOS: “weight Loss and Impact on Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease.”

National Parkinson Foundation: "What are some common nutritional concerns for people with PD?"

National Parkinson Foundation: "How do you maintain a healthy diet?"

Reviewed by Neil Lava on October 28, 2017

SOURCES:

Parkinson’s UK: “Diet.”

PLOS: “weight Loss and Impact on Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease.”

National Parkinson Foundation: "What are some common nutritional concerns for people with PD?"

National Parkinson Foundation: "How do you maintain a healthy diet?"

Reviewed by Neil Lava on October 28, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

How can you stay at a healthy weight when you have Parkinson's disease?

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