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What is the Gleason Scoring System for prostate cancer?

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The Gleason Scoring System uses the numbers 1 to 5 to grade the most common (primary) and second most common (secondary) patterns of cells found in a tissue sample

  • Grade 1: The tissue looks very much like normal prostate cells.
  • Grades 2-4: Cells that score lower look closest to normal and represent a less aggressive cancer. Those that score higher look the furthest from normal and will probably grow faster.
  • Grade 5: Most cells look very different from normal.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “How is Prostate Cancer Diagnosed?”

American Cancer Society: “How is Prostate Cancer Staged?”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Prostate Cancer: Stages and Grades.”

American Joint Committee on Cancer.

UpToDate: “Interpretation of prostate biopsy.”

UpToDate: “Initial staging and evaluation of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Understanding Your Pathology Report: Prostate Cancer.”

Reviewed by Stuart Bergman on February 05, 2016

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “How is Prostate Cancer Diagnosed?”

American Cancer Society: “How is Prostate Cancer Staged?”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Prostate Cancer: Stages and Grades.”

American Joint Committee on Cancer.

UpToDate: “Interpretation of prostate biopsy.”

UpToDate: “Initial staging and evaluation of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Understanding Your Pathology Report: Prostate Cancer.”

Reviewed by Stuart Bergman on February 05, 2016

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How can I find out how aggressive my prostate cancer is?

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