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How can you fight fatigue from advanced prostate cancer treatment?

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  • The cancer or some treatments for it, like radiation, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, or vaccines, can make you feel wiped out. You can get some energy back if you: Exercise every day
  • Eat nutritious food and stay hydrated
  • Get enough rest
  • Focus on your most important tasks and delegate the rest to friends and family

If your cancer treatment gives you anemia (low red blood cell counts), you may also feel tired. Your doctor may suggest supplements, drugs, or blood transfusions to help.

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "After Treatment for Prostate Cancer: Managing Side Effects," "Coping with Cancer-Related Fatigue."

National Cancer Institute: "Radiation Therapy Side Effects and Ways to Manage Them," "What to do when you feel weak or tired (fatigue)."

American Cancer Society: "Hormone (androgen deprivation) therapy for prostate cancer," "Radiation therapy for prostate cancer," "Chemotherapy for prostate cancer."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 20, 2019

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "After Treatment for Prostate Cancer: Managing Side Effects," "Coping with Cancer-Related Fatigue."

National Cancer Institute: "Radiation Therapy Side Effects and Ways to Manage Them," "What to do when you feel weak or tired (fatigue)."

American Cancer Society: "Hormone (androgen deprivation) therapy for prostate cancer," "Radiation therapy for prostate cancer," "Chemotherapy for prostate cancer."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 20, 2019

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How can you treat nausea and vomiting from advanced prostate cancer treatment?

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