PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How is cryotherapy done?

ANSWER

With cryotherapy, an ultra-thin metal probe or needle is inserted into the prostate gland. This is done through an incision that lies between the anus and scrotum. To protect the urethra from the procedure's icy temperatures, a warm saline solution flows through a catheter.

The surgeon uses visual information produced by ultrasound as a guide during the process. A freezing liquid, such as liquid nitrogen or more commonly, argon gas, is infused through the probe into the prostate gland. The intense cold freezes the prostate and destroys any cancerous tissue it contains. Using the images from the ultrasound to identify the cancer tissue, the surgeon can limit damage to normal prostate tissue.

SOURCES:

RadiologyInfo.com: "Cryotherapy."

American Cancer Society: "Recurrent Prostate Cancer: Cryosurgery Offers 'Curative' Treatment."

Prostate Cancer Institute: "Cryotherapy for Prostate Cancer."

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

RadiologyInfo.com: "Cryotherapy."

American Cancer Society: "Recurrent Prostate Cancer: Cryosurgery Offers 'Curative' Treatment."

Prostate Cancer Institute: "Cryotherapy for Prostate Cancer."

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: