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What changes can I expect if I am diagnosed with prostate cancer?

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Here are some things that might be different if you are diagnosed with prostate cancer:

  • Body image. You may need to adjust how you see yourself or deal with changes in your self-esteem.
  • Identity. Some men feel that their masculine identity has changed as a result of the cancer.
  • New family roles. As you go through treatment and recovery, you may find that you can't do everything you used to do at home. Some of these changes may work themselves out over time. For instance, as you recover, you may be able to resume your activities around the house. Others, such as identity and self-esteem issues, could benefit from talking to a professional, people close to you, or other survivors.

SOURCES:

UK National Health Service: "Prostate Cancer."

Urology Care Foundation: "Surgery."

AARP: "Sex and Intimacy."

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Prostate Cancer Treatment."

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center: "Restoring Intimacy."

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "Erectile Dysfunction."

American Cancer Society: "Managing Incontinence for Men With Cancer," "Living With Uncertainty: The Fear of Cancer Recurrence."

Prostate Cancer UK: "Living with and after prostate cancer."

American College of Clinical Oncology: "Follow-up Care for Prostate Cancer," "Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men," "Family Life."

University of Michigan Health System: "Stress Management When You Have Cancer."

Harrington, J. , March 2009. Oncology Nursing Forum

National Cancer Institute: "Self Image and Sexuality," "Family Issues after Treatment."

Maliski, S. , December 2008. Qualitative Health Research

Bokhour, B. , 2007. Communication & Medicine

National Caregivers Library: "Coping Within the Family."

Cancer Support Community: "Managing Emotions."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 7, 2018

SOURCES:

UK National Health Service: "Prostate Cancer."

Urology Care Foundation: "Surgery."

AARP: "Sex and Intimacy."

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Prostate Cancer Treatment."

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center: "Restoring Intimacy."

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "Erectile Dysfunction."

American Cancer Society: "Managing Incontinence for Men With Cancer," "Living With Uncertainty: The Fear of Cancer Recurrence."

Prostate Cancer UK: "Living with and after prostate cancer."

American College of Clinical Oncology: "Follow-up Care for Prostate Cancer," "Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men," "Family Life."

University of Michigan Health System: "Stress Management When You Have Cancer."

Harrington, J. , March 2009. Oncology Nursing Forum

National Cancer Institute: "Self Image and Sexuality," "Family Issues after Treatment."

Maliski, S. , December 2008. Qualitative Health Research

Bokhour, B. , 2007. Communication & Medicine

National Caregivers Library: "Coping Within the Family."

Cancer Support Community: "Managing Emotions."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 7, 2018

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What should you expect when prostate cancer spreads?

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