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What does PIN mean in a prostate biopsy result?

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Sometimes, when a pathologist looks at the prostate cells under the microscope, they don't look cancerous, but they're not quite normal, either. These results are often reported as suspicious, atypical, or prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN).

Many men have low-grade PIN when they are young and never develop prostate cancer. Biopsy results that are atypical or high-grade PIN suggest there may be prostate cancer in another part of the gland. A repeat biopsy is generally recommended.

From: Prostate Cancer Grading WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE: 

American Cancer Society.

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 28, 2018

SOURCE: 

American Cancer Society.

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 28, 2018

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