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What effects will surgery for prostate cancer have on my sex life?

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Sex will be a little different if you have surgery to remove your prostate gland. It means you won’t ejaculate, though you can still have an orgasm. Trouble getting erections or having orgasms is also a risk after an operation or if you have radiation therapy.

You can work with your doctor to cut those risks. Start by asking about "nerve-sparing" surgery and more precise radiation therapy. You can ask about the success he’s had in protecting other men from these side effects.

SOURCES:

UK National Health Service: "Prostate Cancer."

Urology Care Foundation: "Surgery."

AARP: "Sex and Intimacy."

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Prostate Cancer Treatment."

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center: "Restoring Intimacy."

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "Erectile Dysfunction."

American Cancer Society: "Managing Incontinence for Men With Cancer," "Living With Uncertainty: The Fear of Cancer Recurrence."

Prostate Cancer UK: "Living with and after prostate cancer."

American College of Clinical Oncology: "Follow-up Care for Prostate Cancer," "Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men," "Family Life."

University of Michigan Health System: "Stress Management When You Have Cancer."

Harrington, J. , March 2009. Oncology Nursing Forum

National Cancer Institute: "Self Image and Sexuality," "Family Issues after Treatment."

Maliski, S. , December 2008. Qualitative Health Research

Bokhour, B. , 2007. Communication & Medicine

National Caregivers Library: "Coping Within the Family."

Cancer Support Community: "Managing Emotions."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 7, 2018

SOURCES:

UK National Health Service: "Prostate Cancer."

Urology Care Foundation: "Surgery."

AARP: "Sex and Intimacy."

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Prostate Cancer Treatment."

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center: "Restoring Intimacy."

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "Erectile Dysfunction."

American Cancer Society: "Managing Incontinence for Men With Cancer," "Living With Uncertainty: The Fear of Cancer Recurrence."

Prostate Cancer UK: "Living with and after prostate cancer."

American College of Clinical Oncology: "Follow-up Care for Prostate Cancer," "Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men," "Family Life."

University of Michigan Health System: "Stress Management When You Have Cancer."

Harrington, J. , March 2009. Oncology Nursing Forum

National Cancer Institute: "Self Image and Sexuality," "Family Issues after Treatment."

Maliski, S. , December 2008. Qualitative Health Research

Bokhour, B. , 2007. Communication & Medicine

National Caregivers Library: "Coping Within the Family."

Cancer Support Community: "Managing Emotions."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 7, 2018

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Will my sex life ever be satisfying after prostate cancer treatment?

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