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What happens during a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) procedure?

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It usually takes 1 to 4 hours. Before it starts, you'll get an enema to make sure your bowels are empty. You won't be able to eat or drink anything for 6 hours before the operation.

You won't feel any pain during the procedure because you will get anesthesia while it's going on. The doctor will thread a small tube called a catheter through the head of your penis into your bladder to catch urine during the procedure.

Your doctor will put an ultrasound probe into your rectum. It's a small instrument like the ones used for prostate biopsies. The probe may have one or two crystals inside. Sound waves from a crystal bounce back to a computer to make a picture of the prostate gland. This will show where to send the sound waves. A crystal sends focused sound waves through the rectal wall into the prostate.

After the procedure is done and the anesthesia wears off, you can usually go home. The doctor may leave the catheter in for a week, and you will make an appointment to have it removed.

From: What Is a HIFU Procedure? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Key statistics for prostate cancer."

University of California, Los Angeles: "High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)."

Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology : "Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer."

European Urology : "Focal High Intensity Focused Ultrasound of Unilateral Localized Prostate cancer: A Prospective Multicentric Hemiablation Study of 111 Patients."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Ablation Therapy," "Heating and Freezing Used to Destroy Prostate Cancer Cells."

Christopher Saigal, MD, vice chairman of urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA.

Harvard Medical School: "FDA panel rejects high intensity focused ultrasound for early prostate cancer."

American Cancer Society: "What's new in prostate cancer research?"

Journal of the American Medical Associatio n: "High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Prostate Cancer: Novelty or Innovation?"

Future Oncology : "MRI-guided focal therapy of prostate cancer."

Cancer Research UK: "High intensity focal ultrasound (HIFU)."

UCLA Health: "UCLA offers high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for prostate cancer."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Focal Therapies for Prostate Cancer."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 21, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Key statistics for prostate cancer."

University of California, Los Angeles: "High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)."

Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology : "Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer."

European Urology : "Focal High Intensity Focused Ultrasound of Unilateral Localized Prostate cancer: A Prospective Multicentric Hemiablation Study of 111 Patients."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Ablation Therapy," "Heating and Freezing Used to Destroy Prostate Cancer Cells."

Christopher Saigal, MD, vice chairman of urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA.

Harvard Medical School: "FDA panel rejects high intensity focused ultrasound for early prostate cancer."

American Cancer Society: "What's new in prostate cancer research?"

Journal of the American Medical Associatio n: "High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Prostate Cancer: Novelty or Innovation?"

Future Oncology : "MRI-guided focal therapy of prostate cancer."

Cancer Research UK: "High intensity focal ultrasound (HIFU)."

UCLA Health: "UCLA offers high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for prostate cancer."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Focal Therapies for Prostate Cancer."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 21, 2019

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What are the side effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)?

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