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What happens during radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

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External radiation therapy requires regular sessions (generally five days per week) for 8 or 9 weeks.

For each treatment, the radiation therapist will help you onto the treatment table and into the correct position. Once the therapist is sure you are positioned well, he or she will leave the room and start the treatment.

You will be under constant observation during the treatment. Cameras and an intercom are in the treatment room, so the therapist can always see and hear you. Be sure to remain still and relaxed during treatment. Let the therapist know if you have any problems or discomfort. The therapist will be in and out of the room to reposition the machine and change your position. The treatment machine will not touch you, and you will feel nothing during the treatment. Once the treatment is complete, the therapist will help you off the treatment table.

From: Prostate Cancer: Radiation Therapy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

American Cancer Society.

American Urological Association.

FDA.

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 22, 2017

SOURCES: 

American Cancer Society.

American Urological Association.

FDA.

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on October 22, 2017

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Why do they put those marks on my skin for my radiation therapy?

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