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What is PSA?

ANSWER

You probably had a blood test to check your levels of PSA -- a protein called prostate-specific antigen -- before your doctor told you that you have prostate cancer. You'll still get those tests if your cancer has spread beyond your prostate.

The results are important, because if they show that your PSA level rises quickly, you may need different treatment.

SOURCES:

Urology Care Foundation: "Prostate Cancer Testing," "Advanced Prostate Cancer."

The Prostate Cancer Charity: "Recurrent Prostate Cancer."

American Cancer Society: "Following PSA levels during and after treatment."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 22, 2019

SOURCES:

Urology Care Foundation: "Prostate Cancer Testing," "Advanced Prostate Cancer."

The Prostate Cancer Charity: "Recurrent Prostate Cancer."

American Cancer Society: "Following PSA levels during and after treatment."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 22, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How do levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) affect cancer treatment?

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