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What's the treatment for impotence after prostate cancer surgery?

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After surgery or radiation, men may have impotence. Treatment for this side effect includes drugs such as sildenafil (Revatio, Viagra), tadalafil ( Cialis), and vardenafil (Levitra, Staxyn). Other treatments include teaching the man to perform a painless self-injection into the penis (of a drug called Caverject), or vacuum pumps. These treatments work in 15% to 40% cases of impotence after surgery and 50% to 75% cases of impotence after radiation. A penile prosthesis is only used when all other options have failed. Adcirca, 

SOURCES: 

American Cancer Society. "Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer." "Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer."

American Urological Association. "Early Detection of Prostate Cancer."

Medscape.  "Prostatitis Treatment & Management."

Prostate Cancer Foundation. 

Prostate Cancer Research Institute. 

Mayo Clinic. "Prostatitis."

National Library of Medicine. "Vardenafil." "Sildenafil." "Revatio."

National Prostate Cancer Coalition.  U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. "Prostate Cancer Screening Final Recommendation."

UpToDate.com. "Chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome."

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on September 17, 2019

SOURCES: 

American Cancer Society. "Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer." "Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer."

American Urological Association. "Early Detection of Prostate Cancer."

Medscape.  "Prostatitis Treatment & Management."

Prostate Cancer Foundation. 

Prostate Cancer Research Institute. 

Mayo Clinic. "Prostatitis."

National Library of Medicine. "Vardenafil." "Sildenafil." "Revatio."

National Prostate Cancer Coalition.  U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. "Prostate Cancer Screening Final Recommendation."

UpToDate.com. "Chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome."

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on September 17, 2019

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