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When do I need biopsy for my prostate?

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Your doctor may recommend one if you’re showing symptoms of prostate cancer (difficulty peeing, blood in semen, problems getting or keeping an erection) or a blood test shows a high amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). He may also do a digital rectal exam, where he inserts a finger up your bottom to feel if your prostate is enlarged or has bumps. Another option before a biopsy is an ultrasound. Instead of a finger, a small probe is inserted to take pictures of the prostate.

From: What Is a Prostate Biopsy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Tests for Prostate Cancer; Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer;” “Surgery for Prostate Cancer;” “Treating Prostate Cancer; Cryotherapy for Prostate Cancer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Prostate cancer.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Prostate Cancer: Basics.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on March 29, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Tests for Prostate Cancer; Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer;” “Surgery for Prostate Cancer;” “Treating Prostate Cancer; Cryotherapy for Prostate Cancer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Prostate cancer.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Prostate Cancer: Basics.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on March 29, 2019

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How is a prostate biopsy done?

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