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When should you start chemotherapy for advanced prostate cancer?

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If other treatments stop working and your cancer grows, your doctor may recommend chemotherapy. When to start chemo will depend upon many things, such as:

There are many types of chemo drugs. You get them by IV or as a pill. They travel throughout your body to destroy cancer cells. Doctors often combine the chemo drug docetaxel (Taxotere) with prednisone, a steroid, for men with hormone-resistant prostate cancer that has spread.

  • Which types of treatment you already had
  • Whether you need radiation first
  • How well you tolerate chemo
  • Which other options are available to you

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Prostate Cancer Overview," "Hormone (androgen deprivation) therapy for prostate cancer" and "Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ): Treatment Option Overview: Radiation Therapy."

American Urological Association: "Advanced Prostate Cancer."

Prostate Cancer Infolink: "Are all LHRH agonists 'just the same'?"

American Cancer Society web site. 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 21, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Prostate Cancer Overview," "Hormone (androgen deprivation) therapy for prostate cancer" and "Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ): Treatment Option Overview: Radiation Therapy."

American Urological Association: "Advanced Prostate Cancer."

Prostate Cancer Infolink: "Are all LHRH agonists 'just the same'?"

American Cancer Society web site. 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on February 21, 2019

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How do clinical trials help treatment for prostate cancer?

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