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Should I tell people about my prostate cancer?

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You may find it helps to talk about it to your partner, other family members, and friends. Keep these things in mind:

If it's easier to be open with someone you don't know well, try volunteer or professional counselors and other cancer survivors.

  • Don't expect things to stay the same. There will probably be changes in your close relationships as you adjust to life with cancer.
  • Give the other person a chance to express feelings.
  • Be direct about what kind of support you need. Ask what they might need. This might change over time.
  • Talk about things other than your disease. Shared interests can give you a break from stress and bring you closer together.

SOURCES:

Baylor College of Medicine: "Primer on Prostate Cancer for the Newly Diagnosed Patient."

American Cancer Society: "What are the key statistics about prostate cancer?" "Prostate Cancer Overview," "Expectant management, watchful waiting, and active surveillance for prostate cancer," "Choosing a Doctor and a Hospital."

Cancer Research UK: "Coping with prostate cancer," "Who Can Help."

News release, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "Living with Prostate Cancer - Active Surveillance," "Living with Prostate Cancer - Erectile Dysfunction," "Finding A Support Group."

University of California Los Angeles: "Active Surveillance - Watchful Waiting."

Cleveland Clinic: "Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Surgery."

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center: "Restoring Intimacy."

University of Pennsylvania OncoLink: "Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Surgery & Radiation Therapy."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men," "Talking With Your Spouse or Partner."

Prostate Cancer UK: "Living with Prostate Cancer."

Cancer Support Community: "Living with Prostate Cancer."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 07, 2018

SOURCES:

Baylor College of Medicine: "Primer on Prostate Cancer for the Newly Diagnosed Patient."

American Cancer Society: "What are the key statistics about prostate cancer?" "Prostate Cancer Overview," "Expectant management, watchful waiting, and active surveillance for prostate cancer," "Choosing a Doctor and a Hospital."

Cancer Research UK: "Coping with prostate cancer," "Who Can Help."

News release, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "Living with Prostate Cancer - Active Surveillance," "Living with Prostate Cancer - Erectile Dysfunction," "Finding A Support Group."

University of California Los Angeles: "Active Surveillance - Watchful Waiting."

Cleveland Clinic: "Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Surgery."

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center: "Restoring Intimacy."

University of Pennsylvania OncoLink: "Urinary Incontinence After Prostate Cancer Surgery & Radiation Therapy."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Sexuality and Cancer Treatment: Men," "Talking With Your Spouse or Partner."

Prostate Cancer UK: "Living with Prostate Cancer."

Cancer Support Community: "Living with Prostate Cancer."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 07, 2018

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What should I keep in mind when telling people that I've been diagnosed with prostate cancer?

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