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Why do you have to wait 3 months after surgery to have your first PSA test?

ANSWER

You need to wait because some PSA stays in your blood after your prostate is removed. Waiting until it has cleared will increase the chance that you'll get an accurate result.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Following PSA Levels During and After Prostate Cancer Treatment."

American Urological Association: "PSA Testing for the Pretreatment Staging and Posttreatment Management of Prostate Cancer."

British Journal of Medical and Surgical Urology : "PSA velocity and doubling time in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer."

Harvard Medical School: "Immediate radiation when PSA levels spike after prostate cancer surgery helps reduce risk of recurrence."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Radical Prostatectomy," "Top Prostate Cancer Questions," "What Happens if PSA Comes Back After Surgery?"

Mayo Clinic: "PSA Test."

National Cancer Institute: "Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test."

NCCN: "Guidelines for Patients: Prostate Cancer."

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "PSA Rising."

Urology : "Timing of PSA nadir after radical prostatectomy and risk of biochemical recurrence."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Prostate Cancer: Screening."

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on December 11, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Following PSA Levels During and After Prostate Cancer Treatment."

American Urological Association: "PSA Testing for the Pretreatment Staging and Posttreatment Management of Prostate Cancer."

British Journal of Medical and Surgical Urology : "PSA velocity and doubling time in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer."

Harvard Medical School: "Immediate radiation when PSA levels spike after prostate cancer surgery helps reduce risk of recurrence."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Radical Prostatectomy," "Top Prostate Cancer Questions," "What Happens if PSA Comes Back After Surgery?"

Mayo Clinic: "PSA Test."

National Cancer Institute: "Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test."

NCCN: "Guidelines for Patients: Prostate Cancer."

Prostate Cancer Foundation: "PSA Rising."

Urology : "Timing of PSA nadir after radical prostatectomy and risk of biochemical recurrence."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Prostate Cancer: Screening."

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on December 11, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

If your PSA levels are greater than zero after surgery, does this mean you have cancer?

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