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Do people with rheumatoid arthritis take medicine for it?

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Almost everyone with rheumatoid arthritis takes medicine for it. But there are different kinds of medicine. Some drugs help control the disease and limit joint damage. Others ease pain and inflammation but don’t curb joint damage. You may take more than one type of drug. The types of drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis include:

  • Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs
  • Biologic drugs
  • Corticosteroids
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

From: How Doctors Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: “Patient fact sheet: rheumatoid arthritis,” “Patient Education: Biologic Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Position statement: biologic agents for rheumatic diseases.”

Douglas Conaway, MD, rheumatologist, Carolina Health Specialists, Myrtle Beach, SC.

FDA: “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade,” “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: “Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers About Hip Replacement,” “Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Seth Mark Berney, MD, professor, department of medicine; director, Center of Excellence for Arthritis and Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport.

Smolen J. , 2010. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

Theodore Pincus, MD, clinical professor of medicine, Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York.

Thomas Hardin, vice president for research, Arthritis Foundation.

UpToDate: "Assessment of rheumatoid arthritis activity in clinical trials and clinical practice," “Clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis,” “General principles of management of rheumatoid arthritis,” “Patient information: disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs),”“Overview of biologic agents and kinase inhibitors in the rheumatic diseases.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 16, 2019

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: “Patient fact sheet: rheumatoid arthritis,” “Patient Education: Biologic Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis,” “Position statement: biologic agents for rheumatic diseases.”

Douglas Conaway, MD, rheumatologist, Carolina Health Specialists, Myrtle Beach, SC.

FDA: “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade,” “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: “Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Questions and Answers About Hip Replacement,” “Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Seth Mark Berney, MD, professor, department of medicine; director, Center of Excellence for Arthritis and Rheumatology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport.

Smolen J. , 2010. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

Theodore Pincus, MD, clinical professor of medicine, Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York.

Thomas Hardin, vice president for research, Arthritis Foundation.

UpToDate: "Assessment of rheumatoid arthritis activity in clinical trials and clinical practice," “Clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis,” “General principles of management of rheumatoid arthritis,” “Patient information: disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs),”“Overview of biologic agents and kinase inhibitors in the rheumatic diseases.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 16, 2019

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What are the different types of drugs that treat rheumatoid arthritis?

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