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Does rheumatoid arthritis affect menopause?

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Every woman is different. Some with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) find that menopause can affect their RA.

Estrogen levels drop around the time of menopause. When that happens, RA symptoms may worsen. Some women first get symptoms around the time they start menopause. Menopause can make the fatigue that comes with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) worse. If you don’t get enough sleep at night or you think your RA treatment isn’t working as well as it should be, tell your doctor.

From: Menopause and RA: What to Expect WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Attipoe, S. et al. , March 2008. Journal of Women and Aging

Arthritis Foundation: “Arthritis in Women” and “Fetal DNA and Remission in Pregnant Women with RA.”

North American Menopause Foundation (NAMS): “Menopause Basics” and “New NOF Guidelines and the WHO Fracture Assessment Tool or FRAX.”

Linda Russell, MD, assistant attending physician in rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery; assistant professor, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York.

University of Washington Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine: “Sex and Arthritis.”

American College of Rheumatology: “Sex and Arthritis.”

Reviewed by David Zelman on February 05, 2017

SOURCES:

Attipoe, S. et al. , March 2008. Journal of Women and Aging

Arthritis Foundation: “Arthritis in Women” and “Fetal DNA and Remission in Pregnant Women with RA.”

North American Menopause Foundation (NAMS): “Menopause Basics” and “New NOF Guidelines and the WHO Fracture Assessment Tool or FRAX.”

Linda Russell, MD, assistant attending physician in rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery; assistant professor, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York.

University of Washington Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine: “Sex and Arthritis.”

American College of Rheumatology: “Sex and Arthritis.”

Reviewed by David Zelman on February 05, 2017

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