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How can your doctor help with family planning if you have rheumatoid arthritis?

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Your doctor will help you choose a treatment plan that will control your symptoms and keep your baby safe. Low-dose prednisone is generally considered safe during pregnancy. So are hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) and sulfasalazine. While evidence is limited for biologic medicines like etanercept (Enbrel), etanercept-szzs (Erelzi), infliximab (Remicade), and infliximab-dyyb (Inflectra), a biosimilar, many rheumatologists are believe they're safe for pregnancy. Under a doctor's supervision, some women quit RA drugs cold turkey when they begin trying to conceive. This could result in joint damage from flare-ups during the time you're off treatment.

From: Family Planning and Rheumatoid Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Scott Zashin, MD, rheumatologist; spokesperson, American College of Rheumatology.

eMedicine.com: "Rheumatoid Arthritis and Pregnancy."

Medscape: "Pregnancy, Fertility, and Contraception Risk in the Setting of Chronic Disease."

Del Junco, D. , Oct. 11, 1985. The Journal of the American Medical Association

The Arthritis Foundation: "The Genetics Behind Rheumatoid Arthritis."

FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

SOURCES:

Scott Zashin, MD, rheumatologist; spokesperson, American College of Rheumatology.

eMedicine.com: "Rheumatoid Arthritis and Pregnancy."

Medscape: "Pregnancy, Fertility, and Contraception Risk in the Setting of Chronic Disease."

Del Junco, D. , Oct. 11, 1985. The Journal of the American Medical Association

The Arthritis Foundation: "The Genetics Behind Rheumatoid Arthritis."

FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

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Does pregnancy make rheumatoid arthritis symptoms go away?

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