PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How should I adjust my rheumatoid arthritis treatment if I'm trying to start a family?

ANSWER

See your rheumatologist. You need to give some medications months to get out of your system before you try to conceive. That goes for men as well as women -- methotrexate might result in sperm problems that could cause birth defects. If you're taking leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis, you'll need even more advance planning. Because of its long half-life, you need to stop taking leflunomide two years before you try to conceive a baby. But there are ways to wash it out of your system more quickly.

From: Family Planning and Rheumatoid Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Scott Zashin, MD, rheumatologist; spokesperson, American College of Rheumatology.

eMedicine.com: "Rheumatoid Arthritis and Pregnancy."

Medscape: "Pregnancy, Fertility, and Contraception Risk in the Setting of Chronic Disease."

Del Junco, D. , Oct. 11, 1985. The Journal of the American Medical Association

The Arthritis Foundation: "The Genetics Behind Rheumatoid Arthritis."

FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

SOURCES:

Scott Zashin, MD, rheumatologist; spokesperson, American College of Rheumatology.

eMedicine.com: "Rheumatoid Arthritis and Pregnancy."

Medscape: "Pregnancy, Fertility, and Contraception Risk in the Setting of Chronic Disease."

Del Junco, D. , Oct. 11, 1985. The Journal of the American Medical Association

The Arthritis Foundation: "The Genetics Behind Rheumatoid Arthritis."

FDA. “FDA approves Inflectra, a biosimilar to Remicade.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 17, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How can your doctor help with family planning if you have rheumatoid arthritis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: