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Is there a vaccine for Lyme disease?

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As Lyme disease cases increase in the U.S., a vaccine could be on the way.

In July 2017, the FDA gave "fast-track" approval to test potential Lyme disease vaccine VLA15 on adults in the U.S. and Europe. The designation helps speed drugs and vaccines to market more quickly.

There is currently no vaccine to prevent Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne illness reported in the U.S. Cases have been trending upward, more than doubling nationwide between 1995 and 2015 -- and the ticks that spread it continue to show up in new areas.

From: Lyme Disease: Important Facts to Know WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CDC website.

Alan Taege, MD, Department of Infectious Disease, Cleveland Clinic.

EPA: “Climate Change Indicators in the United States.”

American College of Rheumatology.

Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Eisen, R. , March 2016. J Med Entomol

Paul Mead, MD, chief of epidemiology and surveillance activity, Bacterial Diseases Branch, CDC.

John Aucott, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; director, Johns Hopkins Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center.

Press release, Valneva. 

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on April 25, 2018

SOURCES:

CDC website.

Alan Taege, MD, Department of Infectious Disease, Cleveland Clinic.

EPA: “Climate Change Indicators in the United States.”

American College of Rheumatology.

Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Eisen, R. , March 2016. J Med Entomol

Paul Mead, MD, chief of epidemiology and surveillance activity, Bacterial Diseases Branch, CDC.

John Aucott, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; director, Johns Hopkins Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center.

Press release, Valneva. 

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on April 25, 2018

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Where do cases of Lyme disease happen?

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