PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are some differences between juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and adult arthritis?

ANSWER

The main difference between juvenile and adult arthritis is that some children with JRA outgrow the illness, while adults usually have lifelong symptoms. Studies estimate that by adulthood, JRA symptoms disappear in more than half of all affected children. Additionally, unlike adult rheumatoid arthritis, JRA may affect bone development as well as the child's growth.

Another difference between JRA and adult rheumatoid arthritis is the percentage of people who are positive for rheumatoid factor in their blood. About 70% to 80% of all adults with rheumatoid arthritis have rheumatoid factor, but fewer than half of all children with rheumatoid arthritis are rheumatoid factor positive. The presence of rheumatoid factor indicates an increased chance that JRA will continue into adulthood.

SOURCE: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Reviewed by David Zelman on January 30, 2019

SOURCE: 

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Reviewed by David Zelman on January 30, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How does rheumatoid arthritis happen?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: