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How do steroids help arthritis?

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Steroids (short for corticosteroids) are synthetic drugs that closely resemble cortisol, a hormone that your body produces naturally. Steroids work by easing inflammation and slowing the immune system. They are used to treat a variety of inflammatory diseases and conditions.

Corticosteroids are different from anabolic steroids, which some athletes use to build bigger muscles.

From: Steroids to Treat Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Medicines: A Guide for Adults." UpToDate for Patients: "Patient Information: Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." The Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." AGS Foundation for Health in Aging: "Arthritis Pain." Medline Plus: "Cushing Syndrome."




Reviewed by David Zelman on June 13, 2017

SOURCES: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Medicines: A Guide for Adults." UpToDate for Patients: "Patient Information: Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." The Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." AGS Foundation for Health in Aging: "Arthritis Pain." Medline Plus: "Cushing Syndrome."




Reviewed by David Zelman on June 13, 2017

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How are steroids for arthritis given?

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