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What's the treatment for eye problems linked to juvenile arthritis?

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Your rheumatologist and ophthalmologist will work with you on this. If your child has uveitis, he or she might need prescription eye drops. If eye drops don’t lower inflammation enough, your child might need to take anti-inflammatory pills. To avoid long-term side effects of steroid medications, your child might also get a drug such as methotrexate, which would be taken by mouth or as a shot. Severe cases of uveitis may need different kinds of drugs that treat immune system conditions.

SOURCES:

Arthritis Foundation: "Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis."

American College of Rheumatology: "Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis."

Arthritis Foundation: "Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Treatment Options."

The Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on April 21, 2019

SOURCES:

Arthritis Foundation: "Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis."

American College of Rheumatology: "Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis."

Arthritis Foundation: "Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Treatment Options."

The Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on April 21, 2019

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Who is more likely to get rheumatoid arthritis?

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