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When were new kinds of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs approved for treating rheumatoid arthritis?

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The first of a new kind of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Jakinibs or JAK inhibitors, was approved in 2012. Sometimes called “oral biologics,” they're given as pills rather than as a shot or an infusion, as with the other biologics. Jakinibs work from inside the cells to block the enzymes that alert the immune system to an invader.

From: New Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: “Biologic Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Will JAK Inhibitors Change Your RA Treatment?”

Cohen, M. Omair. , Aug. 2013. International Journal of Clinical Rheumatology

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment.”

Lv, S. , published online Oct. 20, 2014. Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

O’Dell, J. , published online July 25, 2013. New England Journal of Medicine

Singh, J. , May 2012. Arthritis Care & Research

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on September 04, 2018

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: “Biologic Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Arthritis Foundation: “Will JAK Inhibitors Change Your RA Treatment?”

Cohen, M. Omair. , Aug. 2013. International Journal of Clinical Rheumatology

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment.”

Lv, S. , published online Oct. 20, 2014. Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

O’Dell, J. , published online July 25, 2013. New England Journal of Medicine

Singh, J. , May 2012. Arthritis Care & Research

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on September 04, 2018

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Are older disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis?

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