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Which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) raise the risk for heart attack and stroke?

ANSWER

All prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are linked to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. They carry a warning about that.

While the actual risk of a heart attack and stroke with NSAIDs is unknown, medical studies are in progress to help find that answer. The risk is likely greatest for people who have heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking.

You and your doctor can weigh the risks and benefits.

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: "Information for Patients About NSAIDs."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "What are NSAIDs?"

Arthritis Foundation: "Studies Highlight the Risks and Health-Care Costs of NSAID Injury."

American College of Gastroenterology: "The Dangers of Aspirin and NSAIDs."

Arthritis Foundation: "Making Sense of NSAIDs: Side Effects."

Reviewed by David Zelman on June 10, 2017

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: "Information for Patients About NSAIDs."

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "What are NSAIDs?"

Arthritis Foundation: "Studies Highlight the Risks and Health-Care Costs of NSAID Injury."

American College of Gastroenterology: "The Dangers of Aspirin and NSAIDs."

Arthritis Foundation: "Making Sense of NSAIDs: Side Effects."

Reviewed by David Zelman on June 10, 2017

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