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Why are steroids injected to treat arthritis?

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Injecting steroids into one or two areas of inflammation allows doctors to deliver a high dose of the drug directly to the problem area. When doctors give steroids by mouth or IV, they cannot be sure an adequate amount will eventually reach the problem area. In addition, the risk of side effects is much higher with oral or IV steroids.

From: Steroids to Treat Arthritis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Medicines: A Guide for Adults." UpToDate for Patients: "Patient Information: Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." The Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." AGS Foundation for Health in Aging: "Arthritis Pain." Medline Plus: "Cushing Syndrome."




Reviewed by David Zelman on June 13, 2017

SOURCES: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Medicines: A Guide for Adults." UpToDate for Patients: "Patient Information: Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." The Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." AGS Foundation for Health in Aging: "Arthritis Pain." Medline Plus: "Cushing Syndrome."




Reviewed by David Zelman on June 13, 2017

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What conditions are treated with steroid injections?

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