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How can schizophrenia cause agitation?

ANSWER

You may not be able to control your emotions or actions if you have schizophrenia. It can also make it hard to tell what's real. That can make you feel troubled, which can make you agitated.

SOURCES:

BMC Psychiatry : “Characterizing the experience of agitation in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.”

Western Journal of Emergency Medicine : “The Psychopharmacology of Agitation: Consensus Statement of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Project BETA Psychopharmacology Workgroup.”

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment : Psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients: from diagnosis to management.”

Translational Psychiatry : “Dementia-related agitation: a review of non-pharmacological interventions and analysis of risks and benefits of pharmacotherapy.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Schizophrenia,” “Bipolar Disorder,” “Autism Spectrum Disorder.”

Alzheimer’s Association: “Anxiety and Agitation.” 

Stanford Health Care: “Treatment Options for Dementia?”

National Institute on Aging: “What Is Dementia? Symptoms, Types, and Diagnosis,” “Coping with Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer’s Disease,” “How Is Alzheimer’s Disease Treated?”

Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback : “The Effects of Hand Massage on Stress and Agitation Among People with Dementia in a Hospital Setting: A Pilot Study.”

Western Journal of Nursing Research : “Acupuncture and Acupressure for Dementia Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms: A Scoping Review.”

Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmaco logy: “Atypical Antipsychotics for Irritability in Pediatric Autism: A Systematic Review of Network Meta-Analysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Stress Management.”

Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity : “Psychiatric and cognitive manifestations of hypothyroidism”

American Thyroid Association: “Hypothyroidism.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD).”

UNC Center for Women’s Mood Disorders: “Menstrually Related Mood Disorders.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Casarella on December 17, 2019

SOURCES:

BMC Psychiatry : “Characterizing the experience of agitation in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.”

Western Journal of Emergency Medicine : “The Psychopharmacology of Agitation: Consensus Statement of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Project BETA Psychopharmacology Workgroup.”

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment : Psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients: from diagnosis to management.”

Translational Psychiatry : “Dementia-related agitation: a review of non-pharmacological interventions and analysis of risks and benefits of pharmacotherapy.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Schizophrenia,” “Bipolar Disorder,” “Autism Spectrum Disorder.”

Alzheimer’s Association: “Anxiety and Agitation.” 

Stanford Health Care: “Treatment Options for Dementia?”

National Institute on Aging: “What Is Dementia? Symptoms, Types, and Diagnosis,” “Coping with Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer’s Disease,” “How Is Alzheimer’s Disease Treated?”

Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback : “The Effects of Hand Massage on Stress and Agitation Among People with Dementia in a Hospital Setting: A Pilot Study.”

Western Journal of Nursing Research : “Acupuncture and Acupressure for Dementia Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms: A Scoping Review.”

Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmaco logy: “Atypical Antipsychotics for Irritability in Pediatric Autism: A Systematic Review of Network Meta-Analysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Stress Management.”

Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity : “Psychiatric and cognitive manifestations of hypothyroidism”

American Thyroid Association: “Hypothyroidism.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD).”

UNC Center for Women’s Mood Disorders: “Menstrually Related Mood Disorders.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Casarella on December 17, 2019

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Are Alzheimer’s disease and dementia tied to agitation?

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