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How is the brain of someone with schizophrenia different?

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Research has found abnormal brain structure and function in people with schizophrenia.

People with schizophrenia may have problems with chemicals called neurotransmitters in their brain related to specific pathways or "circuits" of nerve cells that affect thinking and behavior. Scientists think that problems with how these circuits operate may result from trouble with certain receptors on nerve cells for key neurotransmitters (like glutamate, GABA, or dopamine), or with other cells in the nervous system (called "glia") that provide support to nerve cells within brain circuits.

However, this type of abnormality isn't there in all people with schizophrenia and people without the disease can have it, too.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "Schizophrenia."

MedicineNet.com: "Schizophrenia."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Schizophrenia."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Schizophrenia."

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation: "Schizophrenia."

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 21, 2020

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "Schizophrenia."

MedicineNet.com: "Schizophrenia."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Schizophrenia."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Schizophrenia."

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation: "Schizophrenia."

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 21, 2020

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How does brain abnormality cause schizophrenia?

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