PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How is shared psychotic disorder diagnosed?

ANSWER

If someone has symptoms of a shared psychotic disorder, they’ll answer questions about their physical and psychiatric history and possibly also get a physical exam. There are no lab tests that specifically diagnose shared psychotic disorders. So doctors may use tools such as brain imaging (including MRI scans) and blood tests to rule out other causes. If the doctor finds no physical reason for the symptoms, he or she might refer the person to a psychiatrist or psychologist. These mental health experts will talk to the person, listen to their symptoms, observe their attitude and behavior, and want to know if the person is close to someone who is known to have delusions.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Shared Psychotic Disorder."

PsychologyOne: "Shared Psychotic Disorder."

Drugs.com: "Shared Psychotic Disorder."

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on April 6, 2019

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Shared Psychotic Disorder."

PsychologyOne: "Shared Psychotic Disorder."

Drugs.com: "Shared Psychotic Disorder."

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on April 6, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What is the treatment for shared psychotic disorder?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.