PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How is waxy flexibility treated?

ANSWER

To treat waxy flexibility, the first thing your doctor will do is give you a sedative called a benzodiazepine. It�s an anti-anxiety drug. If you don�t feel better in 4-5 days, your doctor may try electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Experts are studying other treatment options, including:

?Sleep drugs

?NMDA receptor antagonists (amantadine/memantine)

?Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

SOURCES:

Max Fink, MD, professor of psychiatry and neurology emeritus, Stoney Brook University School of Medicine.

William T. Carpenter, MD, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology, University of Maryland.

Journal of Psychopathology : “Catatonia from the first descriptions to DSM 5.”

Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry : “Movement disorders in catatonia.”

The Lancet Psychiatry : “Structure and neural mechanisms of catatonia.”

Dementia & Neuropsychologia : “Catatonia, beyond a psychiatric syndrome.”

Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice : “Catatonia in a patient with bipolar disorder type 1.”

CNS Spectrums : “Catatonia.”

World Journal of Psychiatry : “Catatonia: Our current understanding of its diagnosis, treatment and pathophysiology.”

Mayo Clinic: “EEG (electroencephalogram).”

Encephale: “Catatonia with schizophrenia: From ECT to rTMS.”

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment : “Systematic review of catatonia treatment.”

American Psychiatric Association: “What is Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)?”

European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience : “Response rate of catatonia to electroconvulsive therapy and its clinical correlates.”

General Hospital Psychiatry : “Catatonia in Resource Limited Settings: A Case Series and Treatment Protocol.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 16, 2020

SOURCES:

Max Fink, MD, professor of psychiatry and neurology emeritus, Stoney Brook University School of Medicine.

William T. Carpenter, MD, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology, University of Maryland.

Journal of Psychopathology : “Catatonia from the first descriptions to DSM 5.”

Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry : “Movement disorders in catatonia.”

The Lancet Psychiatry : “Structure and neural mechanisms of catatonia.”

Dementia & Neuropsychologia : “Catatonia, beyond a psychiatric syndrome.”

Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice : “Catatonia in a patient with bipolar disorder type 1.”

CNS Spectrums : “Catatonia.”

World Journal of Psychiatry : “Catatonia: Our current understanding of its diagnosis, treatment and pathophysiology.”

Mayo Clinic: “EEG (electroencephalogram).”

Encephale: “Catatonia with schizophrenia: From ECT to rTMS.”

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment : “Systematic review of catatonia treatment.”

American Psychiatric Association: “What is Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)?”

European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience : “Response rate of catatonia to electroconvulsive therapy and its clinical correlates.”

General Hospital Psychiatry : “Catatonia in Resource Limited Settings: A Case Series and Treatment Protocol.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 16, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

How can I know if someone with schizophrenia might be thinking about suicide?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.